The smallest and southernmost of the Scandinavian countries, Denmark consists of the Jutland Peninsula and its 400 surrounding islands, 78 of which are inhabited and linked to the mainland by ferry or bridge.

The two major islands are densely populated Sjaelland (Zealand), home to the capital Copenhagen and Fyn (Funen). Denmark travel also includes the Faroe Islands and Greenland in the North Atlantic. Bordered by the North and Baltic seas, this maritime nation was once the seat of Viking Raiders.

The standard of living is high and so are the prices. Copenhagen, founded in 1167, is the largest urban center in the region. Cobbled, medieval streets and Europe’s longest pedestrian promenade, Stroget, winds past houses with copper roofs and spires, statues, squares, fountains, boutiques and art galleries.

Top sites are Tivoli Gardens Fairgrounds amusement park, Little Mermaid at the harbor entrance, Freetown Christiania neighborhood, Viking Ship Museum and Copenhagen’s spirited nightlife, with cafes, jazz clubs and beer gardens. Simple and functional Danish design is evident everywhere, from its harmonious civic spaces to the metro rail system to the craftsmanship of the furniture.

Beyond the capital are bustling cities, 18th century villages, a rural countryside with a network of marked bicycling paths and 130 golf courses. On Jutland, visitors can enjoy Legoland, amber hunting in west coast seabeds and the largest Viking burial ground in Aalborg.

Funen, the birthplace of storyteller Hans Christian Andersen, served as an enchanting inspiration for his fairytales, with moated castles, Renaissance churches, medieval castles and fishing villages. Travelers can visit his museum and boyhood home.