St Patrick’s Day Quiz: 17 questions to test your Irishness

St Patrick’s Day Quiz: 17 questions to test your Irishness

Do you have a genuine claim to citizenship, or are you as Irish as soda bread biscotti?

Originally published by Jennifer O'Connell in The Irish Times

The Taoiseach has announced a referendum will be held on extending voting rights in presidential elections to the Irish abroad – an announcement that is not without logistical implications. As Minister for the Diaspora Joe McHugh has warned, figuring out who is potentially eligible to vote would be a “massive piece of work”. In the interest of expediting the process, here are 17 scientifically robust and deadly serious questions we might consider posing to the non-resident Irish, to help determine whether their claim to citizenship is genuine, or whether they are as Irish as soda bread biscotti and Michael Flatley. 

TAKE THE QUIZ

The Journey to Discovery

The Journey to Discovery

My family, like many others, came across the choppy seas with a promise of a new world, new life and writing its own story.

If you are obsessed with history like I am, then you know about the Mayflower, Plymouth Rock, the Pilgrims and a birth of a nation. It could be argued that our story starts here, in 1620, when the Pilgrims set foot on the shores that would be their new beginnings.

They started the story that would one day lead to the formation of our great nation ... America.

Ancestry Travel - Fixing Your Family Tree

Ancestry Travel - Fixing Your Family Tree

Ancestry travel – think of it as authentic travel on steroids. You wander off the beaten path looking for “missing” family members and, in the process, you make connections with local people and learn about your cultural DNA. It doesn’t get more authentic than that.

My trip to Italy to research my roots took me to a place that isn’t on most maps. It also brought me face to face with people I’d never met, but with whom I felt an immediate connection.

Children Benefit if They Know About Their Relatives, Study Finds

Children who know stories about relatives who came before them show higher levels of emotional well-being, according to Emory University researchers who analyzed dinner time conversations and other measures of how well families work.

The research, by Emory psychologists Robyn Fivush and Marshall Duke, and former Emory graduate student Jennifer Bohanek, was recently published in Emory's online Journal of Family Life.

"Family stories provide a sense of identity through time, and help children understand who they are in the world," the researchers said in the paper "Do You Know? The power of family history in adolescent identity and well-being".