Sitting at the cross section of two railroads, in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, ç and was once the industrial leader of the southern United States. During the manufacturing age the population grew so rapidly it was nicknamed the "Magic City". Boasting 99 historic neighborhoods, Birmingham, Alabama is also referred to as the "Cradle of the American Civil Rights Movement".

Today, known for its banking, service based economy and medical research, Birmingham has managed to transform into one of the nation’s most livable cities, offering a vibrant downtown and more "green space" per capita than any other city in the United States. One of the most diverse river ecosystems in America is located here, Cahaba River, along with several other rivers, valleys and mountain ranges such as the Black Warrior River, Shades Valley and Ruffner Mountain, just to name a few.

The climate in Birmingham, Alabama is a humid subtropical climate with the spring and fall months varying with frequent severe thunderstorms and occasional tornadoes touching down in the region. You’ll experience less rain, fewer storms and less humidity during the fall than in the spring. During the late summer you could see an occasional hurricane or tropical storm hit the area due to Birmingham’s location to the Central Gulf Coast. Birmingham sits in the heart of Dixie Alley, a well known tornado alley. Be sure to check weather alerts prior to traveling.

For all you history and art lovers, Birmingham, Alabama is home to several museums such as the Birmingham Museum of Art and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. If festivals are more you’re thing, this city knows how to throw them, from music to films to regional heritage; Birmingham has a festival for everyone. Other attractions located throughout the city include Kelly Ingram Park; several notable civil rights protests took place here, the 16th Street Baptist Church and for all you nature lovers, make sure you check out The Oak Mountain State Park and the Great Smoky Mountains.